Peter Hujar

One of the amazing things about the last 30 years is how underground artists are now old masters (I guess it was ever so).

Case in point Peter Hujar, now a prize of that most august of cultural institutions, the Morgan Library :

One additional sign of his acclaim, the recent (and not very appetizing) novel that used one of his photos as a signature image.

And there was a sympathetic and wonderfully written review in the NYTimes that brought back what it was like to encounter him a generation ago.

“It’s hard to say which is more surprising: that Peter Hujar’s photographs of 1970s and ’80s underground life in New York life have found their way to the Morgan Library & Museum, or that this Classically-minded institution has become unbuttoned enough to exhibit them in a heartbreaker of a show called “Peter Hujar: Speed of Life.”


Commonplace Book: Wacky Weddings

Trying–yet again–to get the blog re-energized. For now just going to use it as a commonplace book, and this Sunday’s NYTimes was full of great stuff. Perhaps none better than this wedding story, which has the best lede I’ve read in a while:

Not your average wedding venue…

“A man born to an Orthodox Jewish family in Toronto and schooled at a Yeshiva and a Japanese-American man raised on the island of Oahu, Hawaii, were married in the rare books section of the Strand Bookstore in Greenwich Village before a crowd of 200 people, against a backdrop of an arch of gold balloons that were connected to each other like intertwined units of a necklace chain or the link emoji, in a ceremony led by a Buddhist that included an operatic performance by one friend, the reading of an original poem based on the tweets of Yoko Ono by another, and a lip-synced rendition of Whitney Houston’s “I Will Always Love You” by a drag queen dressed in a white fringe jumper and a long veil.

The grooms met on the internet. But this isn’t a story about people who swiped right.”

The copyeditor did right by the headline too:
Of All the Blogs in the World, He Walks Into Mine




Masculinities: Gay Lingo, Voices, and Personas

Spurred by a trailer for a new film, “Do I Sound Gay” found some interesting explorations of gay identity on the web. Three bits of video on different facets: Whosoundsgay


Next the fascinating world of Polari, a British gay mid-century slang, here captured in a short film.

Finally, a doc I saw a few years back called “The Butch Factor” –not about language per se, but about gay men and their relationship to masculinity, something that was once such a complicated topic (at least to my generation, or at least to me), but seems, in a welcome development, to be less fraught for many.