National Poetry Month: Poems About Music, Day 29 of 30

This is not, strictly, a poem about music and Hardy did write many fine ones. But this is the Hardy poem that first started me on his poetry, and has stayed with me: one that opened up a sensibility so in sync with my own that it left me a little shaken.

That it opens with family music around the piano, something I grew up with and still do, closed the deal. (See also “The Dead” by James Joyce)

They sing their dearest songs—
       He, she, all of them—yea,
       Treble and tenor and bass,
            And one to play;
      With the candles mooning each face. . . .
            Ah, no; the years O!
How the sick leaves reel down in throngs!

 

       They clear the creeping moss—
       Elders and juniors—aye,
       Making the pathways neat
            And the garden gay;
       And they build a shady seat. . . .
            Ah, no; the years, the years,
See, the white storm-birds wing across.

 

       They are blithely breakfasting all—
       Men and maidens—yea,
       Under the summer tree,
            With a glimpse of the bay,
       While pet fowl come to the knee. . . .
            Ah, no; the years O!
And the rotten rose is ript from the wall.

 

       They change to a high new house,
       He, she, all of them—aye,
       Clocks and carpets and chairs
          On the lawn all day,
       And brightest things that are theirs. . . .
          Ah, no; the years, the years
Down their carved names the rain-drop ploughs.

graveyard

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